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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)
it to light was found dead in his home. rebecca brooks was arrested this weekend after resigning as ceo of news corp. she is expected to testify tomorrow. this is not her first time appearing before parliament, the clip i'm showing you is from 2003. watch closely. brooks testifying with andy coulson. coulson went on to become david cameron's spokesman and has since resigned and has been arrested in the scandal. >> can i ask, the one element if you ever pay the bliss for information? >> we have paid police for information in the past, and it's been -- >> will you do it in the put? >> it depends on -- >> within the code and within the law, there is a clear public interest and the same holds for private detectives, subterfuge. >> it's illegal for police officers to receive payments. >> no, no, no. i just said within the law. >> this is not only the beginning of the scandal. it's the beginning of the news corporation's attempts at damage control. coulson stepping in to blunt brooks' answers. i spoke with the other british whistleblower about the death of sean hoare and about the spread of a
-news international chief rebekah brooks will prepare to face british legislators. >>> two giants of tech as ibm powers ahead but cisco loses its way. >>> and banks lead the losses as debt ditherring continues to drag the world stock markets. >>> rupert murdoch's power and influence will be put to the test later today. he and also his son, james, will be facing uk legislators in just a few hours from now. they'll also be alongside rebekah brooks, former editor of the "news of the world." it's expected to be a harsh grilling for the three individuals over what they knew about alleged phone hacking at the london tabloid "news of the world." those allegations have done quite as much to damage rupert murdoch's reputation as they've done to "news of the world's" stock. it's been plummeting. >> the company's become the target of a hack attack itself. lulzsec is claiming a hack attack with a fake story about murdoch being found dead in his garden. in a tragic turn one of the first journalists to expose hacking at "news of the world" was found dead on monday. sean hull was former "news of the world" emp
to wolf blitzer. "situation room" starts right now. >> thanks very much, brook. >>> two weeks before the united states may plunge into financial crisis. plu, media mogul rupert murdoch is just hours away from being grilled and lambasteds by british law makers and now a whistleblower in the growing phone hackl scandal reportedly is dead. and a 77-year-old man defends his home and family from an intruder with a gun. stand by for the dramatic story. that's even more compelling because -- get this -- he's a member of the united states congress. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the u.s. defaulting on its debt for the first time in history? we can't state it enough, this has enormous consequences for all of us, and time is quickly running out to prevent what the president calls armageddon. let's check in with kate baldwin. she's standing by with the latest. where do the negotiations stand right now? >> the two top republicans in the house. no official readout from the white house, but president obama says we are making progress when asked today by reporters how the deb
newsworthy of large type headlines. two days after she resigned, rebekah brooks walked into a police station for questioning and found herself under arrest. hours later, britain's top police officer, the chief of scotland yard resigned, and he acknowledges that the investigation was inadequate, and steven yates now announcing his resignation. the scandal has been growing steadily after reports that there was a hacking of an answering machine by "news of the world." tomorrow murdoch and his son james are scheduled to appear on a hearing in parliament. cnn will bring you that testimony live. dan rivers is inla london. rebekah brooks is expected to testify tomorrow, and now what are the plans in terms of questioning her tomorrow? >> reporter: well, politicians will have to be careful how they frame the questions to her. in britain, if there is a pending trial or the possibility of a pending trial, you have to be very careful what kind of news coverage is gained from that, because they don't want to prejudge the trial here. they don't want to sway a potential juror one way or the other. and this
murdoch, james murdoch and rebekah brooks on how much they knew about these phone hacking allegations and when did they know it and why didn't they put a stop to it sooner or be more forthcoming. they told lawmakers earlier it was one rogue reporter, an isolated incident and it didn't did any further than that. we know of course that it turns out that thousands of people may have had phone mail messages hacked and lawmakers want to get to the bottom of how much each of them knew. >> the other question is this whistle-blower found dead yesterday tragically. police are looking into that. what is the latest there? >> reporter: what we know is that basically police have confirmed that a man was found dead at his apartment. that man is believed to be the whistle-blower for news of the world. he confirmed that the editor of the paper not only knew about the phone hacking but actively encouraged it from his reporters. he was the only whistle-blower to really go public and confirm that this was the case. now, what we understand from police is that he was found dead at his apartment while his
brooks, will face some tough questioning, appearing before lawmakers this morning, this as the developments in the growing phone hacking scandal seem to be changing by the hour. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in london outside parliment with details. jim, good morning. >> good morning, lynn. well all eyes will definitely be on a small room inside that building behind me, the mother of parliament it's called here. just big enough for 40 or so spectators, but there will be overflow rooms with television sets. this is really must-see tv today in great britain and for many other places. certainly the united states, which is why there's so much media here today as well. as one british politician put it, it's the three musketeers of the murdoch media empire and the phone-hacking scandal that will appear here later today. they'll be grilled by ten members of a select committee. it doesn't sound like much, it's the committee for culture and media. these hearings will only last an hour for rupert and his 38-year-old son, james murdoch. and another hour following that for r
that it is an insult to the family that rebekah brooks, the editor of "news of the world" at the time, is still at her post in news international? >> i've made very clear she was rit to resign. th resnati should have beenccepted. there needs to be root and branch change at this entire organization. >> mr. speaker, i thank the prime minister for that answer and he's right to take the position that rebekah brook should go. and i hope you will come to the debate that ruperturdoch should drop his bid for b sky b, should rise the world has changed and should listen to this house of commons. >> i agree with what the right old gentleman has said and i think it's good that the house of commons is going to speak with one voice. >> this evidence cts sious doubt on mr. coleson's ashurntss that the phone hacking over which he resigned was an isolated example of illegal activities. the prime minister says the chief of staff is not passed on this very serious information. can he now tell us what information he proposes t take against the chief of staff? >> i have given, i think, the fullest possible answer i could
including rebekah brooks and james murdock on 26 separate locations. my question is whether he can assure the house that the bid was not raised at any of those meetings. was there at any time he discussed the bid with officials of the culture? >> 10 days ago, the prime minister said i was not given any specific information that would lead you to change my mind. it would have made every effort to uncover the information. they made every effort for the facts. did would surely have led him to change his mind about mr. coulson. all would decline. he was accused of making payments to police. the prime minister did nothing with the information. in may of 2010, he warned the prime minister of bringing him into downing street. he did nothing. on september the fourth 2010, the new york times published an investigation " in most civil -- quoting multiple sources. we know that article is not enough to open their increase. we know it triggers the termination of the metropolitan police. that led to the author. he said it is right that it does not taken up. the question is why. the prime minister was c
on the face of it, that the news of the world was sacrificed in order to try and protect rebekah brooks' position at news international >> i advocated at the time that this was a step we should take. this was a paper and a title that had fundamentally violated the trust of its readers, and it's something that was a matter of great regret, real gravity, but under the circumstances, and with respect to the bad things that certain of the things that happened at the "american's "nee world" some years ago, it was the right choice for the paper to cease publication. it is important to note and i want to be clear with the committee on this. that the company is doing everything it can to make sure that journalists and staff at the "news of the world" who had nothing to do with any of these issues, who are completely blameless in any of these things, and many are, you know, really have done tremendous work journalistically, that we find reemployment for them anywhere we k. the company is being as generous as we can under the circumstances. the company is being as thoughtful and compassionate for
to the number three spot in the company. and then there is rebekah brooks, a rupert murdoch protege. she was a top executive before she resigned on friday. she was arrested a couple of days later. let's get straight to london to atika shubert. these witnesses are not under subpoena. they don't have to say a word, do they? >> no. they don't, but it's still a court and can be held in tempt of court for example. even though there is no particular oath here, there is an incredible amount of pressure on them to answer these questions. remember, particularly in the cases of james murdoch and rebekah brooks, they have told lawmakers in previous hearings the this was the end of it. it was a rogue reporter and a private investigator and that was the end of it. clearly, it was not. because it turns out that there are, in fact, thousands of phone mail messages that may have been hacked and now they are back in front of lawmakers again trying to explain why they didn't tell the full story the first time around. >> atika, we have been paying close attention to this since early this morning. you know
brooks, they sat there hour after hour, taking the questions in good humor. and that gives them credit to their benefit, that they did go through this process. ultimately, though, tonight, as rupert murdoch did say he doesn't take responsibility for what took place although he will have to be the man that sorts it out. >> are you responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> who are responsible? >> the people i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> can you name people? >> i worked with mr. hinton for 52 years and i would trust him with my life. >> what i think is interesting in that exchange, the normal phraseology for people doing that is, i was not to blame, but i take responsibility. the buck stops here. and what we didn't get there was that phraseology or some version thereof. we also finally, wolf, we did get later on in his final statement the hacking was wrong, the payments to the police were wrong, no excuses. >> and there was an incident there at one point where an intruder just showed up with some shaving cream. tell our viewers what happened. >> the pic
, for whatever motive. that is the question that mrs. brooks has to answer. >> we continue this evening with the incredible story of one of the richest women in china, zhang xin. >> from the outside, i hear friends talk about the rise of china, the politicians knowing what they do. in fact, someone mo who ves, works in china, a different picture. chinese are complaining about the government. the government seems to be rolling out of the policies, and managing the everyday problems. and in terms of theconfence ofecoming a superpower, i see -- i just don't see that. >> we conclude this evening with investigative reporter and author ahony somers. he's written a book called "the eleventh day: the fully sotry 9/11 and osama bin laden." >> what we did in the end was, i hope, successfuy to dispatc to sane americans the utmost of the conspiracy theorist ideas. >> send them away? >> yes. >> but i think what happened was that those ideas, the lingering thoughts about them, have distted the facts and have blurred the things that one really should be concerned about. >> lionel barber and catherine
in order to try to protect rebekah brooks' position at news international. in effect, rather than her being -- having her departure being announced, "the news of the world" was offered up as an alternative to try to deal with the whole thing. do you regret now making that decision? do you regret closing "the news of the world" to try and save rebekah brooks? in hindsight, do you wish you accepted her resignation to start with in order that that paper with a fine tradition could probably continue and all of the people who are now out of work could still be in work? >> i regret very much the pain of people that will not be able to find work. the two decisions were totally unrelated, absolutely sxl totally unrelated. >> so when you came into the uk and said your priority for rebekah brooks -- >> i'm not sure i said that. i was quoted as saying that. i had about 20 microphones stuck in my mouth, so i'm not sure what i said. >> you were misquoted? >> i'm not saying that. i just don't remember. >> i think it's important -- i'm sorry, mr. chairman. >> yes. >> mr. davis, it's important to know the
tell the house about the conversations she had about the bskyb bid with mr. murdoch and rebecca brooks? >> all the details of the meetings and explain all of the conversations were appropriate and she could ask the members of her party to be equally transparent. >> does the prime minister join me in hoping that this is the end of the ever increasing rise of misconduct by police officers across the country? >> the police have to have an operation, have to have a relationship with the media, both at the top level to communicate with the police's right to do strategically, and at the operational level to help them with crime. we have to try to make sure they do not have an inappropriate relationship. >> prime minister, have you ever mentioned the word "bskyb" in the presence of rebecca brooks? >> does not raise serious questions about how the previous limit operated that members opposite thought that it a prepared for the prime minister to be brief on police matters? and the e-mails that were released, didn't show how professional his chief of staff is? >> i thank my hon. friend for putti
. >> brown: once the murdochs were done, another central figure in the scandal-- rebekah brooks-- appeared before the committee. she was editor of the now- defunct "news of the world" during the phone hacking, and later became chief executive at the tabloid's british parent firm news international before resigning last week. brooks said she only recently learned that the phone of the young murder victim, milly dowler, had been targeted. >> it seems incredible that you, as the editor, were so unaware of such fundamental issues to do with this investigation. >> i just.. i think... in some ways, just the opposite-- i don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorize, know, sanction, approve of anyone listening to the voice mails of milly dowler in those circumstances. >> brown: brooks was arrested on sunday, and she repeatedly said today there were things she could not discuss due to the ongoing investigation. but she did say she has lasting regrets that everything did not come out long ago. >> of course, i have regrets. i mean, the idea that milly dowler's phone was accessed by someo
in parliament about it and we carry that live on c-span2. we carry rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks yesterday and we will speak about that. how do you describe to an american audience the importance of "news of the world" as the largest selling sunday newspaper in the country, and the closure of that paper? guest: it was shocking. a lot of people were shocked by the closure. it was a sudden and brutal move, and murdoch's decided that enough was enough -- murdochs decided enough was enough and they had to take this extreme step. "news of the world" set the standard for tabloid journalism. it has been a pretty low standard for recent years, but they have always been in front, always seemed to be getting the best spooks, the best gossip -- best scoops, the best gossip. "news of the world" and "the sun," the murdoch daily tabloid, were the epitaph of tabloid journalism. -- epitome of tabloid journalism the rocket. raucous, titillating tabloid journalism, which we enjoy to extan extent. host: did you know, when you were living in london, rebekah brooks at all and her work? guest: she was editor of
of how these men and rebekah brooks allowed or created or allowed to exist a culture that these things could happen and they didn't know about it. >> and it was profound theater to begin with, and as you mentioned, a lot of questions we would still like answered. we'll see how that plays out, but in the middle of this theater, a subplot, if you will. somebody tries to pie rupert murdoch. describe the scene as you recall it and especially i would say a rather feisty defense of mr. murdoch by his wife. >> oh, i mean, well, we're watching from the back. the picture -- all of a sudden, the noise. you see this woman in pink launch herself, going to give somebody a right hook. you then see james murdoch get out the chair like this. now, at first i couldn't tell whether mr. murdoch sr. had been hit. you can then -- in later pictures if you look close, you can see the foam. more than one person suggested that, you know, this could have been a brick, it could have been, you know, nails, it could have been much more serious. you have to bear in mind if it had been anything like that, it wouldn't
from rebekah brooks. if you see it he was trying to get a pie in the face of rupert murdoch. if we can get that shot back up again, you can see in niz left hand a tin -- and see if we can get that shot back up. it looks like he had a tin in his left hand a cream pie that he was going to smash in the face of rupert murdoch during these hearings. the man was quickly taken away in handcuffs. you saw the images of him outside he had something all over his face. wendy dang in the pink jumping up. she is a volleyball player. that looks like a spike. she's known to be a fan of volleyball. anyway, you can see the pie right there trying to get in the face of rupert murdoch. the woman in the gray i'm not sure who she is. she was sitting to the left op of wendy dang. michelle is with us now. is this ovenly some type of protesters coming in to disrupt this and create a true embarrassment to rupert murdoch by delivering a pie in the face? >> we guess. we're basically looking at the exact same pictures that you are. and we're seeing a feed from all over sources here in the uk. it's the same picture
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)

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